Bayes is Baaack

Bayes illustration
Screen shot from Fathom showing prior (left) and posterior (right) distributions for a situation where you flip a coin 8 times and heads comes up once. Theta is the imagined probability of heads for the coin.

Actually teaching every day again has seriously cut into my already-sporadic posting. So let me be brief, and hope I can get back soon with the many insights that are rattling around and beg to be written down so I don’t lose them.

Here’s what I just posted on the apstat listserv; refer to the illustration above:

I’ve been trying to understand Bayesian inference, and have been blogging about my early attempts both to understand the basics and to assess how teachable it might be. In the course of that (extremely sporadic) work, I just got beyond simple discrete situations, gritted my teeth, and decided to tackle how you update a prior distribution of a parameter (e.g., a probability) and update it with data to get a posterior distribution. I was thinking I’d do it in Python, but decided to try it in Fathom first.

It worked really well. I made a Fathom doc in which you repeatedly flip a coin of unknown fairness, that is, P( heads ) is somewhere between 0 and 1. You can choose between two priors (or make your own) and see how the posterior changes as you increase the number of flips or change the number of heads.

Since it’s Fathom, it updates dynamically…

Not an AP topic. But should it be?

Here’s a link to the post, from which you can get the file. I hope you can get access without being a member. Let me know if you can’t and I’ll just email it to you.

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Published by

Tim Erickson

Math-science ed freelancer and sometime math teacher. In 2014–15, at Mills College in Oakland, California.

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