Category Archives: philosophy

Reflection on 538, Trump, and Bayes

Was the run-up to the recent election an example of failed statistics? Pundits have been saying how bad the polling was. Sure, there might have been some things pollsters could have done better, but consider: FiveThirtyEight, on the morning of the election, … Continue reading

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The Index of Clumpiness, Part One

There really is such a thing. Some background: The illustration shows a random collection of 1000 dots. Each coordinate (x and y) is a (pseudo-)random number in the range [0, 1) — multiplied by 300 to get a reasonable number … Continue reading

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Capture/Recapture Part Two

Trying to get yesterday’s post out quickly, I touched only lightly on how to set up the various simulations. So consider them exercises for the intermediate-level simulation maker. I find it interesting how, right after a semester of teaching this stuff, … Continue reading

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Capture/Recapture Part One

If you’ve been awake and paying attention to stats education, you must have come across capture/recapture and associated classroom activities. The idea is that you catch 20 fish in a lake and tag them. The next day, you catch 25 … Continue reading

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Talking is so not enough

We’re careening towards to the end of the semester in calculus, and I know I’m mostly posting about stats, but this just happened in calc and it applies everywhere. We’ve been doing related rate problems, and had one of those classic … Continue reading

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Coming (Back) to Our Census

Reflecting on the continuing, unexpected, and frustrating malaise that is Math 102, Probability and Statistics, one of my ongoing problems has been the deterioration of Fathom. It shouldn’t matter that much that we can’t get Census data any more, but … Continue reading

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Blood in the Aisles

I don’t quite know how Beth does it! We’re using Beth Chance and Allan Rossman’s ISCAM text, and on Thursday we got to Investigation 1.6, which is a cool introduction to power. (You were a .250 hitter last season; but … Continue reading

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Science and Bayes

Right now, I’m pedaling really hard as I’m teaching a super-compressed (3 hours per day) math class for secondary-credential students. That’s my excuse for the slow-down in Bayes posts. The other being the ongoing problem that it takes me hours … Continue reading

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A Bayesian Example: Two coins, three heads.

As laid out (apparently not too effectively) here, I’m on a quest, not only finally to learn about Bayesian inference, but also to assess how teachable it is. Of course I knew the basic basics, but anything in stats is … Continue reading

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The Search for a Great Bayesian Example

When we teach about the Pythagorean Theorem, we almost always, at some point, use a 3-4-5 triangle. The numbers are friendly, and they work. We don’t usually make this explicit, but I bet that many of us also carry that … Continue reading

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